The Best Age For You To Relocate To Italy

Italy is one of the world’s most popular destinations for relocation and with more than 5 million Expats living in the country, making up just under 10% of the total population, there is a wide range of age groups and reasons for making the move.

Relocating to Italy is a huge moment in anyone’s life, as you experience the excitement and anxieties of the adventures that you are bound to have; but is there an ideal age to relocate?

The people who choose to move to Italy all have their own reasons which are often linked to their age demographic and future aspirations. There is no right age to move to Italy but before you decide to relocate you should weigh up the pros and cons of the country and it’s lifestyle.

Most of the 90 million tourists who visit Italy each year are aged between 30 and 50 and stay for just a few weeks to enjoy the sites and heritage of the incredible country. Expats on the other hand, are a far more diverse group of people that cover the whole spectrum of age groups.

Young Expats In Italy.

Italian is home to a lot of younger Expats in the millennial generation, the majority of which are studying or working abroad. Expat students generally stay for the duration of their course and then return home although some do decide to make Italy their permanent home.

Studying abroad in Italy is a wonderful experience that can have a transformative effect on your life. Not only will you have the perfect chance to learn Italian but you can also immerse yourself in the cultural, art and lifestyle that has made it one of the planet’s top destinations.

When considering what type of course to study you should do plenty of research in advance. Italian universities are not very good for the hard sciences such as chemistry and physics and nor are they renowned for technical subjects including economics, finance and computer sciences. However, when it comes to art, cuisine, fashion and design the universities in Italy are world leading.

One of the major advantages of studying in Italy is that the courses are extremely cheap compared to their American counterparts, with fees ranging from just $1000 per a year up to around $10,000 at the upper end.

However, if you’re a younger Expat who has chosen to move to Italy you may find that the job opportunities are fairly limited, particularly if your Italian language skills are not up to scratch.

That said, there are always jobs available in the Teaching English As A Foreign Language (TEFL) sector although the rates of pay are not excellent. Alternatively, you can find work with companies who do a lot of business with foreigners in the tourist industry, where you can utilize your English.

If you are young though and don’t have a large budget then you will probably find that there are quite a lot of things that you can’t afford to do. That said, Italy is still a good place to relocate to in your younger years if you make the most of the opportunities that present themselves to you. So don’t be put off by the potential challenges if you’re young and considering a move to Italy!

Expat Families In Italy.

Italy is a popular place to relocate to for families with children. The country affords you an excellent standard of living at a lower cost than you would have to pay in most other Western nations including the United States, UK and other developed European Union countries.

If you are considering the prospect of relocating to Italy with your family then you will need to have a job lined up in the country or be able to work remotely because without a job you won’t be allowed to obtain a resident permit, unless you have an Italian spouse.

The education system in Italy is very good and provides a broad range of subjects while still allowing your child to specialize fairly early. The quality of life in Italy is superb and with a large Expat community you’ll soon make friends in a similar position to you.

You will probably need to learn at least some Italian if you intend to stay for the long term because only about 30% of Italians speak English! Obviously, you don’t need to be absolutely fluent, but having the skills to ask for prices in stores, buy train tickets or arrange a taxi will make things far easier for you and your family. Don’t forget as well, that if you’re moving with young children then they will pick up the language in no time at all!

Overall, Italian is a wonderful place to move to as an Expat family where, provided you have a solid income, you can build a fantastic life for you and your children. It is worth remembering that moving to Italy, or any foreign country for that matter, will impact your children in later life; for instance they may lose touch with their families back home. This is something that you will have to take into account when making your decision to relocate.

Older Expats In Italy.

A large proportion of the Expat community in Italy are retirees or semi-retired; drawn to the country by its fantastic weather, relaxed pace of life and stunning scenery and cityscapes.

Italy is considered to be an ideal country to retire in because you can enjoy the ‘Dolce Vita’, or ‘sweet life’, on a pretty tight budget! The cost of living in Italy is very low compared to other Western nations, including in the European Union, with extremely affordable house prices and rentals. The low prices will allow you to make the most of your pension fund while enjoying the finer things in life.

The retired Expat community in Italy is friendly and welcoming so if you’re worried about making new friends when you arrive you’ll have no troubles at all! There are also online social media groups which are made up of retired Expats where you can make new friends and find out what’s happening in your area.

Healthcare services in Italy are extremely good and well run, although in some rural parts of the country you might find it hard to access specialist healthcare services.

Out of all the Expats who live in Italy it can be said that the retirees have the ideal conditions since they are no longer concerned about their careers – the Italian economy is very weak with few opportunities – and they can take advantage of the low cost of living and high quality of life in their twilight years.

Is There A Perfect Age To Relocate To Italy?

There is no fixed rule as to when the best time for you to relocate to Italy is, since it depends so much on your personal circumstances, your financial situation as well as your future aspirations and plans.

Nonetheless, Italy will have different things to offer you depending on your age. For younger, more adventurous Expats the job market is not particularly good but if you can find reliable employment then you enjoy the beautiful nation and the low cost of living. You will be earning a lot less than if you were in the US so if you are worried about falling behind your peers back home then you might not want to stay for too long.

For families with children who relocate to Italy the lifestyle is perfect with plenty of outdoor activities and a huge amount of cultural heritage to explore; which will really open your children’s eyes to the magnificent history of Italy, the Roman Empire and the Catholic Church. Prices are very affordable and the schools are good so the country has a lot to offer Expat families with children.

However, despite the incredible opportunities that Italy can offer younger Expats, the retiree community probably has the best lifestyles of all! Firstly, the costs of living are very cheap which means that your pension will go much further and with time on your hands you can really get to know the local museums, art galleries and other cultural surprises that await to be discovered.

Whatever Your Age, Italy Has Something To Offer You.

Regardless of your age, if you have the financial means, Italy has something to offer you and so if you’ve been considering relocating to another country then you will struggle to find a better one!

Always try to do as much research in advance and get in touch with some people on the social media Expat groups to find out more about what you can expect when you arrive.

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